{PrefLib}: A Library for Preferences

Publications Using PrefLib

Below is a list of papers that have made use of or directly referenced data stored here at PrefLib. If you use our data in a paper please contact contact Nicholas Mattei at nicholas{dot}mattei@nicta.com.au to have you papers added to the list.

Additional references for individual datasets can be found on the appropriate Data pages. All links below jump to Google Scholar.

Even more references, papers, and tutorials can be found in the proceedings of the EXPLORE Workshops:

We may not have everything listed here! Another good place to see papers that have used PrefLib is to check out the citing page at Google Scholar.

Supported By:

  1. Judgment Aggregation under Issue Dependencies. Marco Costantini, Carla Groenland, and Ulle Endriss. 30th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), 2016.
  2. Strategyproof Peer Selection: Mechanisms, Analyses, and Experiments. Haris Aziz, Omer Lev, Nicholas Mattei, Jeffery S. Rosenschein, and Toby Walsh. 30th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI 2016), 2016.
  3. Ballot-Level Observations About Vermont's 2014 General Election. Jeremy A. Hansen. New England Journal of Political Science 8 (2): 185—217, 2016.
  4. Equilibria Under the Probabilistic Serial Rule. Haris Aziz, Serge Gaspers, Simon Mackenzie, Nicholas Mattei, Nina Narodytska, and Toby Walsh. 24th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2015), 2015.
  5. Adapting the Social Network to Affect Elections. Sigal Sina, Noam Hazon, Avinatan Hassidim and Sarit Kraus. 14th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2015), 2015.
  6. Manipulating the Probabilistic Serial Rule. Haris Aziz, Serge Gaspers, Simon Mackenzie, Nicholas Mattei, Nina Narodytska, and Toby Walsh. 14th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2015), 2015.
  7. A study of human behavior in online voting. M. Tal, R. Meir, and Y. Kobi Gal. Proceedings of AAMAS, 2015.
  8. The complexity of recognizing incomplete single-crossing preferences. E. Elkind, P. Faliszewski, M. Lackner, and S. Obraztsova. Proceedings of AAAI, 2015.
  9. Complexity of Manipulative Actions When Voting with Ties. Z. Fitzsimmons and Edith Hemaspaandra. Algorithmic Decision Theory, 2015.
  10. Conventional machine learning for social choice. J. A. Doucette, Kate Larson, and Robin Cohen. Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), 2015.
  11. Privacy in Elections: k-Anonymizing Preference Orders. N. Talmon. Fundamentals of Computation Theory, 2015.
  12. Pnyx: A Powerful and User-friendly Tool for Preference Aggregation. Felix Brandt, Guillaume Chabin, and Christian Geist. Proceedings of AAMAS, 2015.
  13. Voting with Rank Dependent Scoring Rules. Judy Goldsmith, Jerome Lang, Nicholas Mattei, and Patrice Perny. 28th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI 2014), 2014.
  14. DEMOCRATIX: A Declarative Approach to Winner Determination. G. Charwat and A. Pfandler. 5th Workshop on Computational Social Choice (COMSOC), 2014.
  15. Theoretical and empirical evaluation of data reduction for exact Kemeny Rank Aggregation. N. Betzler, R. Bredereck and R. Niedermeier. Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, 28(5):721-748, Springer, 2014.
  16. Multi-Organ Exchange: The Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts. John P. Dickerson and Tuomas Sandholm. Proceedings of AAAI, 2014.
  17. Measuring Diversity of Preferences in a Group. V. Hashemi and U. Endriss. Proceedings of ECAI, 2014.
  18. Price of Fairness in Kidney Exchange. John P. Dickerson, Ariel D. Procaccia, Tuomas Sandholm. Proceedings of AAMAS, 2014.
  19. Better Human Computation Through Principled Voting. Andrew Mao, Ariel D. Procaccia, and Yiling Chen. Proceedings of AAAI, 2013.
  20. A Behavioral Perspective on Social Choice. Anna Popova, Michel Regenwetter. and Nicholas Mattei. Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence. Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence, 68, 2013.
  21. Which Voting Rule is Most Likely to Choose the Best Option?. N. Tideman and F. Plassmann. Public Choice, 2013.
  22. How frequently do different voting rules encounter voting paradoxes in three-candidate elections?. N. Tideman and F. Plassmann. Social Choice and Welfare, 2013.
  23. Failure-Aware Kidney Exchange. John P. Dickerson, Ariel D. Procaccia, Tuomas Sandholm. Proceedings of EC, 2013.
  24. Modeling the outcomes of vote-casting in actual elections. N. Tideman and F. Plassmann. In: Dan Felsenthal and Mose Machover (eds.) Electoral sytems: Paradoxes, assumptions, and procedures. Springer, 217 - 251, 2012.
  25. Optimizing Kidney Exchange with Transplant Chains: Theory and Reality. John P. Dickerson, Ariel D. Procaccia, Tuomas Sandholm. Proceedings of AAMAS, 2012.
  26. An Empirical Study of Voting Rules and Manipulation with Large Datasets. Nicholas Mattei, James Forshee, and Judy Goldsmith. Proceedings of COMSOC, 2012.
  27. Dynamic Matching via Weighted Myopia with Application to Kidney Exchange. John P. Dickerson, Ariel D. Procaccia, Tuomas Sandholm. Proceedings of AAAI, 2012.
  28. Where Are the Hard Manipulation Problems?. Toby Walsh. Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research, 42, 1-39, 2011.
  29. Empirical Evaluation of Voting Rules with Strictly Ordered Preference Data. Nicholas Mattei. Proceedings of ADT, 2011.
  30. Budgeted Social Choice: From Consensus to Personalized Decision Making. Tyler Lu and Craig Boutilier. Proceedings of IJCAI, 2011.
  31. Partial Kernelization for Rank Aggregation: Theory and Experiments. N. Betzler, R. Bredereck, and R. Niedermeier. Proc. 5th International Symposium on Parameterized and Exact Computation (IPEC '10), 2010.
  32. Is Computational Complexity a Barrier to Manipulation?. Toby Walsh. Proceedings of CLIMA-XI, 2010.
  33. A Survey and Empirical Comparison of Object Ranking Methods. T. Kamishima, H. Kazawa, and S. Akaho.. In J. Fürnkranz and E. Hüllermeier, editors, Preference Learning, 2010.
  34. Where are the really hard manipulation problems: The phase transition in manipulating the veto rule. Toby Walsh. Proceedings of IJCAI, 2009.
  35. Fixed-Parameter Algorithms for Computing Kemeny scores - Theory and Practice. R. Bredereck. Thesis, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Jena, 2009.
  36. A Live Experiment on Approval Voting. Jean-François Laslier and Karine Van der Straeten. Experimental Economics 11: 97–105, 2008.
  37. Nantonac Collaborative Filtering: Recommendation Based on Order Responses. T. Kamishima. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD), 2003.
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